Discussion:
TBB vs Ice weasel fingerprint
(too old to reply)
Jan Nielsen
2014-10-22 04:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Hi all.

The new version of Tails ships with a modified version of the Tor browser.
According to this site, https://panopticlick.eff.org , this browser gives
12.75 bits of fingerprintable data. I tested the old Iceweasel browser and
its score was 8.6 bits.

I was using the same laptop for both the tests, so it seems to me that the
new TBB version of the browser gives off more fingerprintable data.

What are your thoughts on this? Browser fingerprinting seems to be a
leading way to track a and identify people on the net. Shouldn't this be
receiving more focus?
intrigeri
2014-10-22 14:12:25 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Post by Jan Nielsen
The new version of Tails ships with a modified version of the Tor browser.
According to this site, https://panopticlick.eff.org , this browser gives
12.75 bits of fingerprintable data. I tested the old Iceweasel browser and
its score was 8.6 bits.
Which specific differences account for this raised number exactly?
Post by Jan Nielsen
I was using the same laptop for both the tests, so it seems to me that the
new TBB version of the browser gives off more fingerprintable data.
What are your thoughts on this? Browser fingerprinting seems to be a
leading way to track a and identify people on the net. Shouldn't this be
receiving more focus?
First of all, note that the tests done by panopticlick are mostly
outdated in today's web tracking landscape, and should not be taken
*that* seriously.

Secondly, as you surely are aware of, we do not develop the Tor
Browser: we merely integrate it into Tails. So, if you can replicate
the same results with the "real" TBB, and if you can pinpoint specific
regressions, then you'll want to talk to the TBB developers about it.
Otherwise, if the results you're getting are specific to Tails, then
there may be a bug we need to fix.

Thanks!

Cheers,
--
intrigeri
Soul Plane
2014-10-22 19:23:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by intrigeri
Post by Jan Nielsen
I was using the same laptop for both the tests, so it seems to me that
the
Post by Jan Nielsen
new TBB version of the browser gives off more fingerprintable data.
What are your thoughts on this? Browser fingerprinting seems to be a
leading way to track a and identify people on the net. Shouldn't this be
receiving more focus?
First of all, note that the tests done by panopticlick are mostly
outdated in today's web tracking landscape, and should not be taken
*that* seriously.
Why not? What is outdated about it? Is there somewhere better? I wonder if
what Jan is seeing is due to Mozilla's recent switch from Firefox 24 ESR to
31 ESR, since I'm guessing that's what Iceweasel is based on now.
intrigeri
2014-10-23 06:09:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Soul Plane
Post by intrigeri
First of all, note that the tests done by panopticlick are mostly
outdated in today's web tracking landscape, and should not be taken
*that* seriously.
Why not? What is outdated about it?
I'm no expert in this field, and I can't answer you off-hand, so I'm
afraid you'll have to do your own research if you want to learn more
about it. Sorry. I suggest first looking into the archives of the
tor-talk mailing-list, since that's where I got this impression from.
Post by Soul Plane
Is there somewhere better?
I don't think so.

Cheers,
--
intrigeri

Lisa Minogue
2014-10-23 05:12:26 UTC
Permalink
Jan Nielsen <jan.nielsen135-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

I was using the same laptop for both the tests, so it seems to me that the new TBB version of the browser gives off more fingerprintable data.
What are your thoughts on this? Browser fingerprinting seems to be a leading way to track a and identify people on the net. Shouldn't this be receiving more focus?
May I suggest that you re-post your questions on either tor.stackexchange.com or on "The Tor Blog" under the title "Tor Browser 4.0 released" (URL: https://blog.torproject.org/)

My reason is that your questions are about TBB which is not specific to Tails.
-----------------------------------------------------Mail.be, WebMail and Virtual Officehttp://www.mail.be
Loading...